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Classroom Resources

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The National WWII Museum is dedicated to providing materials you can use in your classroom to teach about the war. We offer free, primary-source driven lesson plans, image galleries, and other resources to make teaching WWII easier for you and more interactive for your students.

Classroom Resources For Teachers

The National WWII Museum is dedicated to providing materials you can use in your classroom to teach about the war. We offer free, primary-source driven lesson plans, image galleries, and other resources to make teaching WWII easier for you and more interactive for your students.

  • Traveling and Special Exhibit Curriculum

    The Museum develops lessons plans and other curriculum materials using primary sources and other content from our traveling and special exhibitions. These materials work whether you are able to experience the exhibit in person, or are joining us from afar.

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  • Get In The Scrap

    Inspired by the scrapping efforts of students during World War II, Get in the Scrap! is a national service learning project for students in grades 4-8 all about recycling and energy conservation.

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  • Operation Footlocker

    The National WWII Museum has launched Operation Footlocker, providing schools across the country with unique hands-on opportunities to explore the history and lessons of World War II by analyzing WWII artifacts

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  • Red Ball Express

    The Red Ball Express is The National WWII Museum's mobile educational outreach program. Reserve your classroom visit today.

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  • Real World Science Curriculum

    Integrating STEM and history, Real World Science lessons show students how science and technology helped the United States overcome big challenges during the war.

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  • See You Next Year! High School Yearbooks From WWII

    Millions of teenagers coming of age during the war years documented their school days in much the same way students still do today: in school yearbooks. Today, these yearbooks give students a chance to “see themselves” in WWII history.

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