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From the Collection to the Classroom

Put the Museum's innovative exhibits and extensive collection of artifacts to work in your classroom.

FROM THE COLLECTION TO THE CLASSROOM

TEACHING HISTORY WITH THE NATIONAL WWII MUSEUM

Register for FREE to access lesson plans, essays, and multimedia resources from The National WWII Museum. 

VISIT THE CLASSROOM

Put the Museum's innovative exhibits and extensive collection of artifacts to work in your classroom with the all-new ww2classroom.orgRegistration is easy, free, and helps us serve you better!

"I have already decided that the next time that I teach my WWII class, that these essays will be replacing the textbook that I have used for this class in the past."

Jacob

High School Teacher - Nebraska

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Displaying 1 - 12 of 35 results
  • Article Type

    War Crimes on Trial: The Nuremberg and Tokyo Trials

    Following victory, the Allies turned to the legal system to hold Axis leaders accountable. In an unprecedented series of trials, a new meaning of justice emerged in response to war crimes and crimes against humanity committed by both the Germans and the Japanese throughout the war.

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  • Article Type

    Great Responsibilities and New Global Power

    World War II transformed the United States from a midlevel global power to the leader of the “free world.” With this rapid rise in power and influence, the United States had to take on new responsibilities, signaling the beginning of the "American era."

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  • Article Type

    Occupying Germany and Japan

    The end of World War II brought unexpected challenges for American servicemembers in both Europe and the Pacific. Fighting forces turned into forces of occupation, working to maintain a fragile peace while living amongst former enemies.

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  • Article Type

    Cold Conflict

    The United States was not the only leading power on the world stage after the end of World War II; it had a new competitor for this power in the Soviet Union. Tensions between the former allies quickly grew, leading to a new kind of conflict—one heightened with the threat of atomic weapons—that came to dominate global politics for the remainder of the twentieth century.

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  • Article Type

    The Four Freedoms

    In January of 1941, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt outlined a vision of the future in which people the world over could enjoy four essential freedoms. This vision persisted throughout World War II and came to symbolize the ideals behind the rights of humanity and the pursuit of peace in a postwar world.

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  • Article Type

    Liberation and Legacy

    Dr. Rob Citino highlights the moments of celebration, as well as realization of the repercussions that followed Allied victory and the end of World War II.

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  • Article Type

    Liberation in China and the Pacific

    Dr. Rana Mitter depicts how China held a critical role in the Pacific theater during the war as a key ally for the United States. The war's end, however, brought a devastating blow to American diplomacy as China ultimately fell to communism, forever changing the global balance of power in the emerging Cold War.

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  • Article Type

    "Destroyer of Worlds": The Making of an Atomic Bomb

    At 5:29 a.m. (MST), the world’s first atomic bomb detonated in the New Mexican desert, releasing a level of destructive power unknown in the existence of humanity. Emitting as much energy as 21,000 tons of TNT and creating a fireball that measured roughly 2,000 feet in diameter, the first successful test of an atomic bomb, known as the Trinity Test, forever changed the history of the world.

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  • Article Type

    The Cost of Victory

    As fighting came to an end in 1945, people the world over faced for the first time the unprecedented extent of destruction and loss of life caused by World War II. As the costs of victory came into devastating focus, the diplomatic responses, rising global tensions between the United States and the Soviet Union, and social disruption that followed in the aftermath of this conflict showed that World War II was truly "the war that changed the world."

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  • Article Type

    Uniting Communities for War

    Fighting World War II presented daunting military obstacles overseas, but it also involved serious challenges for American communities on the Home Front. Men and women from across the country left home to enter defense industry jobs, government service, and the military, all of which left many vacancies in local businesses, hospitals, schools, governments, and other institutions. 

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