dividing bar

NEWS:

dividing bar

50% off Museum Admission for Louisiana Residents in September

During the month of September, present a valid Louisiana driver’s license and get 50 percent off Museum general admission! The Museum has undergone a stunning and rapid expansion in recent years, adding three pavilions—the John E. Kushner Restoration Pavilion, US Freedom Pavilion: The Boeing Center, and Campaigns of Courage: European Pacific Theaters—which has only enhanced our immersive telling of the war that changed the world.

NOTE: The discount is half off general admission only; Beyond All Boundaries and Final Mission: USS Tang Submarine Experience are full price. Please limit four discounted general admissions per guest.

Plan your visit to the Museum today.

Visit our calendar for information on upcoming programs and events at The National WWII Museum in New Orleans or sign up for our email list to receive regular updates.

dividing bar Exhibits Plan a Visit Honor Roll Beyond All Boundaries Stage Door Canteen American Sector dividing bar

FEATURED EVENTS:

dividing bar Meet the Author: 2015 Pulitzer Prize Winner David I. Kertzer, PhD, presents 'The Pope and Mussolini' Celebrating the End of the War Teacher Appreciation Happy Hour

Meet the Author: 2015 Pulitzer Prize Winner David I. Kertzer, PhD, presents "The Pope and Mussolini"
Thursday, September 17, 2015
5:00 p.m.–8:00 p.m.
Join us as David I. Kertzer, PhD, presents The Pope and Mussolini: The Secret History of Pius XI and the Rise of Fascism in Europe, the gripping story of Pope Pius XI's secret dealings with Mussolini. Learn more and RSVP.

 

Lunchbox Lecture: Stan Chiocchio presents "The Mighty Eighth: Fighter Coverage and Strategic Bombing"
Wednesday, September 16, 2015
12:00 p.m.–1:00 p.m.
Stan Chiocchio will conclude the third part of the B-17 in the Mighty Eighth Air Force. He will cover from 1944 until war's end, when the US gained control of the sky over Germany. Learn more.

 

Teacher Appreciation Happy Hour
Wednesday, September 16, 2015
4:00 p.m.–6:00 p.m.
Local teachers are invited to join Museum staff in the Louisiana Memorial Pavilion. Learn about our educational offerings, receive free classroom resources, and get one-of-a-kind access to our newest special exhibit. Learn more and RSVP.

dividing bar

TAKE ACTION:

dividing bar Purchase Tickets Make A Donation Shop Museum Store Plan a Visit Signup for eNews dividing bar

WHAT'S ON:

dividing bar

September 5, 2015
Victory Corps Saturday
10:00 am–2:00 pm

September 9, 2015
White Glove Wednesdays
9:00 am – 12:00 pm
Louisiana Memorial Pavilion

September 12, 2015
"Sentimental Journey: The Big Bands of World War II"
6:00 pm Dinner Seating, 8:00 pm Show-Only Ticket
BB's Stage Door Canteen

September 12, 2015
Victory Corps Saturday
10:00 am–2:00 pm

September 15, 2015
The Victory Belles present "Songs that Won the War"
6:00 pm Dinner Seating, 8:00 pm Show-Only Ticket
BB's Stage Door Canteen

September 16, 2015
Teacher Appreciation Happy Hour
4:00 pm–6:00 pm
Louisiana Memorial Pavilion

dividing bar

CONNECT:

dividing bar
dividing bar

MUSEUM BLOG:

dividing bar

As we continue down the Road to Tokyo, we stop next at the powerful Philippines gallery, which will cover the major events of the American campaign to retake the Philippine islands, offering a special opportunity for observing the build up and outcome of the biggest naval battle in World War II, Leyte Gulf. The Allies’ […]

The post ROAD TO TOKYO COUNTDOWN: PHILIPPINES appeared first on The National WWII Museum Blog.

Read More

bar

Welcome back to school, teachers! This month’s Calling All Teachers e-newsletter highlights the many ways you can explore the Museum – or bring the Museum and its rich collection of oral histories and artifacts into your classroom. During our upcoming professional development webinar, you can discover how to integrate the Museum’s digital resources and primary-source-based […]

The post Bring History Alive With Primary Sources appeared first on The National WWII Museum Blog.

Read More

bar

Having sent a uranium bomb to the Pacific Theater, tested a plutonium core at Trinity, and sent another plutonium core to the Pacific Theater, Los Alamos received the plutonium for another plutonium core. The plutonium was sent to the metallurgy group to be pressed into two hemispheres and nickel plated. The plan was to build another […]

The post SciTech Tuesday: Harry Daghlian and ‘The Demon Core’ appeared first on The National WWII Museum Blog.

Read More

bar

FEATURED ARTIFACT:

dividing bar

1944 Topeka High School Sunflower Yearbook

The motivation for many African Americans fighting for their right to fight in World War II was the hope that, by displaying determination and bravery on the battlefield, conditions might improve for black civilians on the Home Front. In the 1940s, conditions varied for African Americans depending on their geographic locale, occupation, and gender. Across the United States, racial segregation in schools and in the workforce was upheld by law. The discriminatory policy of "separate but equal" manifested itself in many different ways; some brutally apparent, others more subtle. The latter approach to racial segregation can be seen in the pages of the 1944 Sunflower yearbook of Topeka High School in Topeka, Kansas. In the early pages of the Sunflower, we are greeted by the familiar sight of prom royalty; however, only a few pages later we see a second set of prom kings and queens: separate prom courts, one white and one black. Despite being academically integrated since its founding, all sports, clubs, and extra-curricular activities at Topeka High School during World War II were strictly segregated by race.

View the yearbook in the Museum's online collection, See You Next Year: High School Yearbooks from WWII, to find out more.


dividing bar

FOCUS ON:

dividing bar

Fighting for the Right to Fight: African American Experiences in WWII

Our newest exhibition, Fighting for the Right to Fight: African American Experiences in WWII is a poignant retelling of the stories of the thousands of African Americans who rushed to enlist at the start of the war, intent on serving the country that treated them as second-class citizens. Open since July 4, the special exhibit discusses how hopes of equality inspired many to enlist, the discouraging reality of the segregated non-combat roles given to black recruits, and the continuing fight for "Double Victory" that laid the groundwork for the Civil Rights Movement.

View the microsite to learn more.

 

dividing bar