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NEWS:

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NOTICE: Andrew Higgins Drive is temporarily closed to vehicles and pedestrians between Camp Street and Magazine Street for the construction of a new Founders Plaza at The National WWII Museum. The Museum’s main entrance for the duration of construction is at 945 Magazine Street.

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Brundibár

May 14 at 7:30 p.m.
May 15 at 3:00 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.
US Freedom Pavilion: The Boeing Center

Together with the New Orleans Opera Association, The National WWII Museum will present three performances of Brundibár, a two-act children's opera written by Jewish Czech composer Hans Krása, who composed the musical fable in 1938 for a competition sponsored by Czechoslovakia's Ministry of Education. The events of World War II derailed the competition; a winner was not announced, and prize money was not given out. Instead, Krása and his opera were relocated to Theresienstadt, a concentration camp devoted primarily to artists, the intelligentsia, and children, in what is now the Czech Republic. Krása was ordered to act as head of musical activities for the camp, where he used available materials and instruments to give Brundibár its debut on September 23, 1943, under the watchful eyes of Nazi guards. The opera would go on to have 55 performances at Theresienstadt and became a symbol of hope for the Jews in the camp, who visualized the evil organ grinder character of Brundibár as Adolf Hitler, defeated over and over. It was also used by the Nazis as a propaganda tool: They promoted Theresienstadt as a model camp to hide the deportations and exterminations of Europe's Jewish population, and in 1944 used the performance of Brundibár to help convince inspectors from the International Red Cross and the Papacy that all was well in the concentration camps.

Today, Brundibár is still performed in its historical context, highlighting its poignancy and terrible irony. Its three performances at The National WWII Museum will be performed by local children and accompanied by educational programming focused on Ela Weissberger, her story of survival and her memories of the struggles she and fellow prisoners faced to bring the opera to life, even as many of its cast members were being exported to extermination camps. Three performances at The National WWII Museum will take place in US Freedom Pavilion: The Boeing Center, overhung by restored warbirds—the very planes that were being piloted by US forces as the opera had its original run in Thereseinstadt.

Purchase tickets here or call 504-528-1944 x 314.
Price: $20 adults, $5 children

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Plan your visit to the Museum today.

Visit our calendar for information on upcoming programs and events at The National WWII Museum in New Orleans or sign up for our email list to receive regular updates.

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FEATURED EVENTS:

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Meet the Author
Monday, May 9
5:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.
Winston Groom presents The Generals: Patton, MacArthur, Marshall and the Winning of World War II
Learn more and RSVP.

 

Brundibár
Saturday, May 14
Sunday, May 15
With New Orleans Opera, the Museum will present three performances of Brundibár, a two-act children's opera. Learn more and purchase tickets.

 

The Butterfly Project Family Workshop
Saturday, May 14
2:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Children ages 8–12 are invited to an afternoon workshop designing ceramic butterflies with Holocaust survivor Ela Weissberger.
Learn more and RSVP.

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MUSEUM BLOG:

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Home Front Friday is a regular series that highlights the can do spirit on the Home Front during World War II and illustrates how that spirit is still alive today! Today is Arbor Day, which is all about going green! April is also Lawn and Gardening Month, making it a perfect time to discuss one […]

The post Home Front Friday: How Green is Your Garden? appeared first on The National WWII Museum Blog.

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On September 1, 1923 at 11:58 AM an earthquake with a magnitude of 7.9 occurred in a bay just south of Tokyo. Tokyo and Yokohama, a relatively young port city with a strong international influence, were the closest large population centers. After the earthquake a tsunami with an 11 meter high crest hit Yokohama and […]

The post SciTech Tuesday: The Ring of Fire and WWII appeared first on The National WWII Museum Blog.

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Today is Earth Day, and it’s all about going green! During World War II, going green wasn’t just about saving the environment, but helping out on the Home Front. Recycling, called scrapping back then, and conserving materials, could mean the difference between defeat or victory over the Axis! Here at The National WWII Museum, we […]

The post Get in the Scrap this Earth Day! appeared first on The National WWII Museum Blog.

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FEATURED PROGRAM:

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Get in the Scrap!

A Service Learning Project for Grades 4-8

Inspired by the scrapping efforts of students during World War II, Get in the Scrap! is a national service learning project for students all about recycling and energy conservation. Your students have the power to affect positive change on the environment, much like students 70 years ago played a positive role on the Home Front in securing victory in World War II.

Sign up your class, complete fun activities, share your progress with the Museum, and win great prizes for your students!

Teachers, sign up today at getinthescrap.org!


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FOCUS ON:

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Fighting for the Right to Fight: African American Experiences in WWII

Our newest exhibition, Fighting for the Right to Fight: African American Experiences in WWII is a poignant retelling of the stories of the thousands of African Americans who rushed to enlist at the start of the war, intent on serving the country that treated them as second-class citizens. Open since July 4, the special exhibit discusses how hopes of equality inspired many to enlist, the discouraging reality of the segregated non-combat roles given to black recruits, and the continuing fight for "Double Victory" that laid the groundwork for the Civil Rights Movement.

View the microsite to learn more.

 

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