In Memory of What I Cannot Say
Media Resources

The Art of Guy de Montlaur

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Please credit all images "Courtesy of The National WWII Museum."

Feu, 1957
(Fire)

Created during his Baroque period in 1957, Montlaur began using the palette knife on the canvas rather than the brush. The title of this work is another reference to his wartime experiences.
Oil on Canvas
Loan Courtesy of the Montlaur Family

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Composition Plage, 1951
(Composition Beach)

Colleville Beach was Montlaur’s inspiration for this 1951 painting. In 1944, the beach at the village of Colleville-sur-Mer was code-named Omaha and was the scene of some of the heaviest fighting on D-Day. Today, the Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial sits atop the bluff and overlooks the beach.
Oil on Canvas
Loan Courtesy of the Montlaur Family

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C’est commecelui qui peint après avoir vu un ami, 1966
(This is like he who paints after having seen a friend)

Painted by Montlaur after a 1966 automobile accident triggered memories of his wartime trauma.
Oil on Canvas
Loan Courtesy of the Montlaur Family

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Un juin tôt le matin, 1972
(One June early morning)

A reference to D-Day, June 6, 1944.
Oil on Canvas
Loan Courtesy of the Montlaur Family

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Auto-portrait sans indulgence, 1969
(Self-portrait with no indulgence)

Montlaur painted this self portrait exactly 30 years after he sketched himself while serving at the front in 1939. In a 1969 journal entry, Montlaur engages his portrait in conversation and asks the question, “And what if we were truly friends?”
Oil on Canvas
Loan Courtesy of the Montlaur Family

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