Meet the Author: Mary M. Lane

Writer and journalist Mary M. Lane presents her recent book Hitler's Last Hostages: Looted Art and the Soul of the Third Reich at the Museum. In 2013, the German government confiscated roughly 1,300 works of art from the apartment of Cornelius Gurlitt, the reclusive son of one of Hitler’s primary art dealers, a discovery kept secret by the government for two years. Lane reveals the fate of those works and tells the definitive story of art in the Third Reich and Germany’s ongoing struggle to right the wrongs of the past.

March 25 5:00 PM - 8:00 PM
+ Add to calendar 2020-03-25 5:00:00 PM 2020-03-25 8:00:00 PM America/Mexico_City Louisiana Memorial Pavilion 945 Magazine St, New Orleans, LA 70130 Meet the Author: Mary M. Lane Writer and journalist Mary M. Lane presents her recent book Hitler's Last Hostages: Looted Art and the Soul of the Third Reich at the Museum. In 2013, the German government confiscated roughly 1,300 works of art from the apartment of Cornelius Gurlitt, the reclusive son of one of Hitler’s primary art dealers, a discovery kept secret by the government for two years. Lane reveals the fate of those works and tells the definitive story of art in the Third Reich and Germany’s ongoing struggle to right the wrongs of the past.
Location: Louisiana Memorial Pavilion
945 Magazine St, New Orleans, LA 70130

Mary M. Lane Presents “Hitler's Last Hostages: Looted Art and the Soul of the Third Reich”

Interviewed by: Tyler Bamford, PhD, Leventhal Research Fellow with the Institute for the Study of War and Democracy

5:00 p.m. Reception | 6:00 p.m. Presentation | 7:00 p.m. Book Signing

The Institute for the Study of War and Democracy is delighted to host Mary M. Lane for a discussion of her recent book Hitler's Last Hostages: Looted Art and the Soul of the Third Reich.

Nazism ascended by brute force and by cultural tyranny. Weimar Germany was a society in turmoil, and Hitler’s rise was achieved not only by harnessing the military but also by restricting artistic expression. Hitler, an artist himself, promised the dejected citizens of postwar Germany a purified Reich, purged of “impure” influences.

When Hitler came to power in 1933, he removed so-called “degenerate” art from German society and promoted artists who he considered the embodiment of the “Aryan ideal.” Artists who had produced challenging and provocative work fled the country. Curators and art dealers organized their stock. Thousands of great artworks disappeared—and only a fraction of them were rediscovered after World War II.

In 2013, the German government confiscated roughly 1,300 works by Henri Matisse, George Grosz, Claude Monet, and other masters from the apartment of Cornelius Gurlitt, the reclusive son of one of Hitler’s primary art dealers, Hildebrand Gurlitt. For two years, the government kept the discovery a secret. In Hitler’s Last Hostages, Lane reveals the fate of those works and tells the definitive story of art in the Third Reich and Germany’s ongoing struggle to right the wrongs of the past.

The reception and presentation are free and open to the public but please register to attend. Register online or call 504-528-1944 x 412.

Can’t make it to the Museum? Watch the event live.

About the Author:
Mary M. Lane is a nonfiction writer and journalist specializing in Western art, Western European history, and anti-Semitism. Lane received one of five Fulbright Journalism Scholarships at 22-years-old, gained international recognition as the Chief European Art Reporter for The Wall Street Journal, and published numerous exclusive Page One articles on the art trove of Hildebrand Gurlitt. Since leaving the Journal, Lane has been a European Art Contributor for The New York Times.